A Conversation for Gismos, Whatsits and Thingummys

"a ball of dung attached to a sheep's rear end"

Post 1

Anonymouse

Still reading, "a ball of dung attached to a sheep's rear end" is a dingleberry, not a dingbat.

smiley - mouse<-- raised sheep, I know.


"a ball of dung attached to a sheep's rear end"

Post 2

Itchy Ron

Absolutely. However, it "was" a dingbat, in 19th-Century Boston. smiley - smiley

I'm glad you raised this, as it's so important to be precise in these things smiley - smiley


"a ball of dung attached to a sheep's rear end"

Post 3

Anonymouse

"Dingleberry" is also a term for someone who is not making sense, or has overlooked the obvious, by the way. smiley - winkeye


"a ball of dung attached to a sheep's rear end"

Post 4

Itchy Ron

I see what you did there.

smiley - laugh


"a ball of dung attached to a sheep's rear end"

Post 5

Anonymouse

smiley - mouse<-- raised dingleberries, too. smiley - evilgrin


"a ball of dung attached to a sheep's rear end"

Post 6

ITIWBS

...a ball of dried up dung attached to the hair on the sheep's hind end... is sometimes is simply referred to as a 'dag', a word lending itself to other constructions like 'dagworm' and 'dried up dag' which may also be used more or less pejoratively.

'Dingleberries' is also used in American welding slang for tiny metal pellets thrown out from an electrical arc weld by 'magnetic arc blow', usually a pile of them to be swept up when one is done with the welding and may be used for anything similar.


"a ball of dung attached to a sheep's rear end"

Post 7

Itchy Ron

Dag would be an interesting word for a Guide Entry. We don't use it in the UK, but it's pretty common down under.


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