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Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 1

Magwitch - Community Editor, Moderator, Sub Editor and Scout - Are you reading The Post every week?

Hi ~jwf~

Just a thought, and a semi formal* request.

You've read 'Mr P (and George)' and I was wondering whether you'd like to submit a review for smiley - thepost?

I've ordered a copy meself, it should arrive this week, but I'm really rather rubbish with words and couldn't write a review to save me life.

As I say, just a thought

Mags

*semi formal in that I'm one of smiley - thepost editors and I'm always touting for business smiley - whistle


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 2

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

Sure, let me get my pen...

smiley - biro

Divided into three distinct sections it is not at first obvious
that this slender volume of tales is truly breaking new ground
in literary form. One assumes it is a collection of short tales,
anecdotal adventures suitable for bedside reading. Most of the
stories in all three sections are told by a First Person narrator
and the genius of this device is not at first apparent because we
are seduced into an assumption that "I" will be the same person.

But it soon becomes hard to believe such a wide spectrum of
human personality and experience could be embodied in any
single mind. The reader's assumptions are challenged, even
strained in trying to rationalise that the same mild-mannered
everyman who agonises over finding a wallet could suddenly
find himself crashing a getaway car somewhere in France or
discovering mummified remains in the cellars of an Italian villa.

In the first section the "I" is a certain lovable Mr P, whom one can
easily identify as a middle-aged everyman of middle-class means,
passing through the trials of modern suburban life in the UK, as he
finds lost wallets and loses his mobile phone in a wheelie-bin. This
gentle 'Mr P' is reminiscent of James Thurber's 'little man', engaged
in the eternal battle of the sexes and valiantly going forth to meet
the whirled at large with a pen that proves mightier than any sword
and a heart big enough to embrace the follies of modern life.

Then comes the second section. And as I read each tale it finally
began to dawn on me that the First Person narrator, the "I" who
is telling the stories, could not possibly be that same person.

And then, the proverbial penny finally drops! And we realise how
effectively the writer has engaged our sympathy for a wide variety
of characters, not always pleasant or likable characters. We have
been led into a pattern of reflexively identifying with the voice of "I",
looking for ourselves in the voice. A brilliant device!

These tales are like Shakespearean soliloquies. Pheroneous steps
into the center of each character's persona and is speaking as the
"I", delivering deeply personal introspective perspectives, much
like the classic soliloquies, each one unique to each hero or
villain and the whirled they live in.

Just as Hamlet, MacBeth, Marc Anthony, Romeo and Richard III
all speak to us in the First Person we would never for a moment
begin to think they were the same character - even if we know they
are written by the same brilliant writer and perhaps even performed
by the same famous actor.

By this device, Pheroneous engages our rational mind even as he
nudges us further and further into some extreme situations and
many different, even possibly psychotic characters. As lovable as
the original Mr P has been, so too do the other darker characters
get into our hearts and minds. It is a brilliant trick and I do not
hesitate to repeat emphatically that I consider them analogous
to Shakespeare's soliloquies.

http://www.lulu.com/shop/pheroneous/mr-p-and-george/paperback/product-20734931.html

Enjoy!

smiley - booksmiley - biro


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 3

Magwitch - Community Editor, Moderator, Sub Editor and Scout - Are you reading The Post every week?

That is absolutely brilliant smiley - disco.

Thank you smiley - cheers

I'm *really* looking forward to getting it and reading it later in the week.

smiley - smooch


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 4

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

smiley - towel


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 5

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

Magwitch, please add the following Footnote:

Post Script:
Not surpringly Pheroneous has modestly objected to my
comparison of his work to that of Shakespeare and I have
since informed him that this comparison is only to the form,
to the means of multiple character revelations via a series
of First Person narrations - a rare and difficult literary device.
Few writers have ever dared to attempt it, especially with so
many distinct voices in a single volume.
My review was not meant to suggest any other comparison
to the Bard's use of language or poetic kills.
smiley - winkeye
~jwf~


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 6

Magwitch - Community Editor, Moderator, Sub Editor and Scout - Are you reading The Post every week?

G'wan then, seeing as it's you. smiley - winkeye



Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 7

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

REVISION:
Please ignore the above post and use the following:

Post Script:
Not surprisingly Pheroneous has modestly objected to my
comparison of his work to that of Shakespeare and I have
since informed him that this comparison is only to the form,
to the means of multiple character revelations via a series
of First Person narrations - a rare and difficult literary device.

Few writers have ever dared to attempt it, especially with so
many distinct voices in a single volume. A very few 20th Century
novelists have attempted to describe a plot from a variety of
perspectives offered by a range of characters involved. This has
been done in Mystery novels for example where each character is
witness to a crime and has a unique perception and memory of the
same events.

But I am at a loss to recall such a variety of characters in such a
variety of independent scenarios speaking directly from the author.

My review was never meant to suggest any other comparison to the
Bard's poetic language skills. For one thing there is very little use of
metaphor (except where possible ghosts appear). And there's not an
ounce of iambic pentameter to be seen or a prithee sirra to be heard
for miles.

smiley - biggrin
~jwf~


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 8

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum


If that's too long and rambling just use the first
and maybe the last paragraph.

*Brain fade/verbal vertigo*
smiley - shrug
~jwf~


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 9

Magwitch - Community Editor, Moderator, Sub Editor and Scout - Are you reading The Post every week?

Last one, please, sweet. It takes ages to sort out...


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 10

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

smiley - sorry

I do understand.
And do appreciate your effort and patience.

I got caught up in the emotional commitment to Mr P.

Yes that last one for sure.
Just the first and last paragraph.
Please and thanks.

I can get into the whole Mystery writer business
if a conversation erupts below the article.

I am putting my pen down now.
smiley - biro
~jwf~


Magwitch calling ~jwf~

Post 11

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

For your convenience:

Post Script:
Not surprisingly Pheroneous has modestly objected to my
comparison of his work to that of Shakespeare and I have
since informed him that this comparison is only to the form,
to the means of multiple character revelations via a series
of First Person narrations - a rare and difficult literary device.

My review was never meant to suggest any other comparison to the
Bard's poetic language skills. For one thing there is very little use of
metaphor (except where possible ghosts appear). And there's not an
ounce of iambic pentameter to be seen or a prithee sirra to be heard
for miles.

smiley - towel
~jwf~


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