A Conversation for Common Irish slang

More?

Post 1

salicyclic (keeper of worn out leather army boots)

banjaxed - that word makes me think of my boyfriend (because he says it all the time, not because he is banjanxed)

another one he says a lot is yoke, which i think means 'thing'.


More?

Post 2

Lash LeRue

"Yoke" does mean thing,as does "bob"


More?

Post 3

Woodpigeon

Yep - I got "banjaxed", but for some strange reason, I left out "yoke". smiley - blush - Pretty obvious one to miss! Thanks!


More?

Post 4

salicyclic (keeper of worn out leather army boots)

it was reading 'banjaxed' that got me thinking of yoke - he also says something along the lines of 'up ye biyah' whenever we're at the pub - no idea what this means.

btw - loved the interesting tidbit about the the spelling of crack/craic - i'd only ever seen it spelt the second way, and had totally assumed it was in gaelic.


More?

Post 5

GodBen (The Magical Astronomer) - 00000011

<<"Yoke" does mean thing,as does "bob">>

There is also the word yokeymabob, which I believe means thingymajig.


More?

Post 6

Woodpigeon

craic? Yep - I had some detailed discussions with Recumbentman about this when I was writing the article, and he's right, pretty much. The spelling "craic" is actually a really recent phenomenon - it used to be "crack" until a drug by the same name appeared on the scene. Suddenly expressions like "God, we had great crack at the party on Saturday" were tantamount to a sacking offense!


More?

Post 7

Nightfever

Oh good, someone else already brought up the lack of yoke/yolk in the article. smiley - smiley

I remember using it while talking to english mates once and them not having a clue what I was saying. I'd never known it was an irish-only thing until then.

And, yes, the crack/craic thing...I remember having seen it spelt "crack" while a child, but then I grew up with it as "craic". Seemed weird, but I never really thought about it.


More?

Post 8

Nightfever

plus:

http://overheardindublin.com/

and

http://overheardincork.com/

for more english as she should be spoke...


More?

Post 9

nilllios

On the crack v craic thing, I have always spelled it craic, and remember it being used in Irish books in school (Craic agus Spraoi). I have also seen it on a pub in the Gaeltacht in the 80s (Craic agus Ceol above the door) so I don't think it is a 90s thing.
It's possible that it became the more accepted version of the spelling in the nineties. Maybe prior to that it was just used by Gaelgoirs?


Key: Complain about this post

More?

Write an Entry

"The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is a wholly remarkable book. It has been compiled and recompiled many times and under many different editorships. It contains contributions from countless numbers of travellers and researchers."

Write an entry
Read more