A Conversation for Special Air Service Selection and Training

Selection

Post 1

Researcher 198520

I would like to know, what would a civilian have to do in order to train for the selection phase of sas selection? If a civvie was of average fitness and of stronge mind would this be enough.


Selection

Post 2

Researcher 201602

Try putting in about 6 months of serious training beforehand. Average fitness will not do.


Selection

Post 3

Researcher 202604

The SAS are the best, if you want to be the best you have to train like them.
Most, if not all the men on active service with the SAS have a similar level of fitness to any professional athlete, I suggest that you take another look at yourself and decide whether or not your willign toput yourself throught it all.


Selection

Post 4

Researcher 204359

Most successful applicants have the same kind of fitness level as professional athletes, and a strong mind won't help you tabbing a dozen miles over the Brecon Beacons. Also, you must have been in a army regiment for at least three months prior to applying, so a civvie couldn't apply anyway.
If you want to apply, one method would be to join the TA version of the SAS, so that you could keep your civvie job at the same time. I found the best training method was running. Forget the books and website describing an 'easy way to do it.' Run. Only that can prepare you for the rigor of selection. And get used to running in boots. Sometimes, do some hard tabbing, and slowly increase the weight in your bergen. Good nutrition also helps. Lastly, make sure you keep hydrated, it's unbelievably easy to get low on water after some running.

If you're mad enough to try to get in, good luck!


Selection

Post 5

Stuart

"and a strong mind won't help you tabbing a dozen miles over the Brecon Beacons."

I would disagree with that statement. 70% of physical ensurance is what goes on in the mind. As they say, its surprising what you can do when you put your mind to it.

Are you sure it is three months before applying for selection. Unless its changed in the last 10 years or so it was two years. It should be noted that most, if not all SAS soldiers are in there late twenties/early thirties. SAS training is not all physical endurance, there is a good deal of mental endurance involved as well which requires a degree of maturity.

Stuart


Selection

Post 6

Researcher 206232

You do need to be in for 2 years before being considered for regular selection. As an earlier researcher noted, you can apply direct to 21 or 23 SAS (the two terrie army regiments). You'd still need to spend 2 years with the part timers before being considered for 22 SAS. The terrie course is slightly easier than the regular course (you need to be able to average 4 km/h over rough terrain with a 30lbs+ backpack instead of the 3 km/h required of the regulars). The course runs over 9 alternate weekends and a weekday training night. A typical weekend involves 2 tabs across local terrain. A typical weekday invloves a 5 mile run followed by some pracical work such as basic map reading (a lot of recruits, for various reasons, haven't done anything like that before). The culmination of the course is a 2 week battle camp based around the brecon beacons, with test week forming the latter of the 2 weeks. The TA test week coincides with the test week for the selection courses being run by 22 and the SBS, although as mentioned you don't need to keep up with their recruits' timings. If you're thinking of going along to try your hand at the minute, as well as the physical adversities, you'll have additional difficulties owing to the increased interest which accompanies any major miliitary deployment (e.g. after the Falklands and the Gulf there were up to 3 times as many potential recruits on the courses). Basically, you get a lot of "Walter Mitties" turning up who can't tell the difference between selection and going to the pictures. If you want to stand out for the right reasons, I'd advise working hard at not getting noticed by the DS - don't talk to the other recruits about why you are doing it and keep your distance from any of the larger than life characters who are bound to turn up. Good luck.


Selection

Post 7

Foxybabes

private members group for current and ex sf guys and those going for selection. Please include sufficient info/background with your application -cheers
http://groups.msn.com/OperatorsInternational


Selection

Post 8

Researcher 206232

PS: I of course meant that the regulars need to average 4km/h, it's the terries who can get away with 3 km/h.


Selection

Post 9

Researcher 207937

I have read a lot about selection but where exactly do you apply for selection?


Selection

Post 10

Stuart

If you were in a position to apply for SAS selection, you would already know the answer to that question.

First you need to join the Army, either as a regular or TA soldier in the Regiment or Corp of your choice. When you have served two years, then you can apply for selection. Your Unit Headquarters will provide all the information you need. As previoulsy stated, you cannot apply for SAS selection as a civillian, only serving soldiers can apply.

Regards

Stuart


Selection

Post 11

Researcher 207937

I am not in the army I was just wondering. Thankyou anyway for the information.


Selection

Post 12

Researcher 207937

If you fail selection can you apply again at a later time?


Selection

Post 13

Stuart

It really depends on why you failed. If you get taken to one side and told, very nicely, that the SAS is not for you, then it probably not a good idea to try again. However, generally speaking you can have another go. There are those that fail for some minor deiciancy that can be put right with more practice and are encouraged to give it another go at a later date.

Stuart


Selection

Post 14

Researcher 207937

Can someone tell me what the basic fitness test involves and what a DCI is?


Selection

Post 15

Stuart

The original article explains pretty much what the fitness requirements are. 40-mile in 20 hours with 30 Kgs on your back is going to test the fittest, and remember also this is usualy done in winter in pretty foul weather. Sunshine and cool breezes would make it to easy. smiley - biggrin

This equates to two miles an hour, which doesnt sound like much, little more than a brisk walking pace. Most reasonably fit people could do two miles an hour over five hours. Keep it up for 20 hours, doing your own map reading and over some pretty rough country carrying 30 Kgs of kit, which is weiged at the end to check you havn't dumped anything along the way, and it begins to tell. Also consider, that a with a tab lasting 20 hours in the UK, some of it is going to be done in darkness.

Although the march is nominally 40 miles, most people will end up doing considerbly more unless their night navigation skills across Brecon Beacons are perfect, which it rearly is.

DCI - Defence Council Intructions. These are instructions that are issued peridically be the Ministry of Defence concerning various aspects of running an Army. The full title is DCI (Army) which as you would guess, relates to the Army. There are also DCI (Navy), DCI (Air), DCI (General) and DCI (Civilian). DCI (General) relates to instructions affecting the entire Armed Forces. DCI (Civilian) relates to civilian emloyers of the MOD, but you won't find anything to do with the SAS there. DCIs are Resticted and are only available within a Militry Environment.

Stuart


Selection

Post 16

Researcher 207937

I meant the basic fitness test and the medical you have to pass to be considered for selection. Or is that what you just explained?


Selection

Post 17

Stuart

Sorry, I misunderstood your question. There is no basic fitness test to be considered for selection. The asumption is that you have a basic level of fitness otherwise you wouldnt be putting yourself forward. You will have a medical edxamination to ensure that there are no underlying medical problems. Having said that, there have been cases where soldiers undergoing SAS selection have died through over exertion.

However, if there is any shortcommings in your basic fitness, it will soon be highlighted in the run-up to the final test as described above. All you need to go for selection is the ability to sign your name on a piece of paper.

It should be remembered though, that physical fitness is not everything. There is an element of mental fitness required. That can be the downfall of many potential recruits to the SAS. They do have a unique way of testing your mental stability and motivation to its limits. Believe me, in the space of a week they can have you believing that black is white and the moons made of green cheese.

Stuart


Selection

Post 18

Researcher 208968

eh, the moons not made of green cheese? interesting. im trying to write a report on personality testing methods 4 SAS, lots of info about for physical testing but not mental, what kind of personality traits does the sas look for. thanks x


Selection

Post 19

Stuart

Generally speaking, a self motivated individual that can think for themselves, even under extreme conditions of stress. It has been found the introverts make better SAS soldiers than extoverts which is probably at odds with what the rest of the army is looking for.

One of the tests is an escape and evasion where everyone gets captured and then undergoes intorrigation to test their resistance. No physical torture, or mental stuff. One of the most difficult aspects of intorrigation is not knowing how long it is going to last. But the SAS have a saying; "Nothing lasts forever", although an hour can be made to seem like a day and a day like a week. This is a pretty easy thing to achieve if you are in a darkened room with a hood over your head. Sensory depreavation can play havoc with the mind.

Stuart



Selection

Post 20

Stuart

No physical torture, or mental stuff.

That should read No physical torture, just mental stuff.

Stuart


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