This is the Message Centre for TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

I've been reading

Post 1

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

I can't keep up with the What Book Are You Reading convo, so I'm starting my own for my reading. I'm bringing a book to work with me to read over lunch.

So far: The Colour of Magic (reread); The Constitution of Ireland.

Thoughts:
This is not Discworld as I know it. It's easy to see it was unformed. Good fun, and some clever humour in places, but not the fully realised world of the later novels.

There's some odd stuff in there. Article 45 actually requires the Parliament to be somewhat socialist (I have no problem with that); some of the family law stuff is a little sexist, or at least potentially so; and there's an uncomfortable amount of religious gumpf, including in the various mandated oaths for public office. Overall, it's probably not bad, though I've read no other to compare it with.

Next up: Neil Gaiman.

TRiG.smiley - book


I've been reading

Post 2

BeowulfShaffer

Which Gaiman book?


I've been reading

Post 3

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

Smoke & Mirrors; The Light Fantastic (reread).

I liked the Gaiman enough to buy another collection of short stories since. Liked? Some of them blew me away! Amazing stuff.

I'm surprised at how much of early Discworld I'd forgotten.

TRiG.smiley - book


I've been reading

Post 4

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

Born Gay: The psychobiology of sex orientation
by Glenn Wilson and Qazi Rahman.
ISBN 0-7206-1223-3.

A library book. Overdue. I'll return it and pay my fine tomorrow.

There's some fascinating stuff in here, some of which I'll even remember. Did you know that sexuality is correlated with handedness, finger-length ratios, birth order, birth weight, adult body size, childhood gender conformity/nonconformity, and much else? And there's excellent evidence that it's all set before birth.

TRiG.smiley - booksmiley - geek


I've been reading

Post 5

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

Equal Rites.

Reading Discworld in order is odd. This book introduces Esme Weatherwax, but she's not the Esme Weatherwax we know and love from the later books (just as the Death in the first two novels is not the Death we know and love from the rest of the Discworld canon). There are several ideas played with here which are never seen again in the Discworld. It's a funny book, and is still, in "early Discworld" style, a simple parody in places, most notably the magical dual between Granny Weatherwax and Archchancellor Cutangle.

It sparkles, though. It's a very funny book.

Also, some ideas introduced here do come into play throughout the universe: The difference between witch magic and wizard magic is introduced, as is the idea of "borrowing". Esk instinctively knows that Granny hasn't turned herself into a rabbit, and that you can't just "magic stuff away".

Not solid Discworld, but no effort to read. And worth reading, if only for the broomstick.

TRiG.smiley - booksmiley - witchsmiley - wizard


I've been reading

Post 6

Menthol Penguin - Currently revising/editing my book

Post 4, never knew any of that. Sounds interesting thoughsmiley - smiley


I've been reading

Post 7

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

Discworld doesn't find it's style until Sorcery or Mort, IMO.


I've been reading

Post 8

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

But you have to love that broomstick. And the Luggage, which was introduced in the very first novel. Discworld was good from the very beginning, but it did improve as it went on.

I'm aiming to get the entire series read by August, when there's another Discworld Con.

(I forgot to mention that Equal Rites is a reread, though I last read it ages ago.)

TRiG.smiley - wizard


I've been reading

Post 9

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

Mort (definitely a reread)

This is probably the Discworld novel I've read most. I'm quite bad at rereading, generally. Once I've read a book once, I'll go back and dip in and out. I don't usually read it again cover to cover. But I've read most of Mort many times. It's a joy.

At the Discworld convention in Ennistymon, quite a few people agreed that Mort is where the Discworld takes off. Quite a few new characters appear here, some of whom reappear in later works. And this is the book in which Death grows into something wonderful.

TRiG.smiley - booksmiley - skull


I've been reading

Post 10

Sho - with added slapping hand

I'm about to start reading Pratchett, my mum is a long time fan of his, has everything he has published and lots of them are signed by the man himself. I've just got her Unseen Academicals for her birthday, and realised that I've only read 4 or 5 of his - and I have absolutely loved what I've read.

In fact, at the risk of being pilloried, given where we are, I think he's much better than Douglas Adams... smiley - run


I've been reading

Post 11

KB

He certainly writes a lot more. smiley - winkeye

I can't see you running into much trouble for praising Pratchett too much, though. While I love what I've read of his books (and I love the character of Death! So Mort's back on the reading list smiley - ta) - the religious zeal of TP's loyal readers can be excruciating.

I'd find it much easier to enjoy his books if people didn't have this idea that it's make-or-break and that everyone is a convert in waiting.

I think I know the wrong Pratchett-bashers.

smiley - laugh


I've been reading

Post 12

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

He's been called "fresher" than Adams. Perhaps he is. On the other hand, I've just heard The Journey of the Sorcerer, and it definitely stirred something in me. The original radio series of Hitchhiker's was something very very special.

TRiG.smiley - aliensmile


I've been reading

Post 13

Sho - with added slapping hand

I know what you mean about the really zealous fans, I tend to avoid them. I much prefer the ones like my mum who get on with their Passion for Pratchett quietly.

I remember 3 of us listening to the Hitchhiker radio series in the dorm under cover of darkness with those little one-ear ear pieces plugged into our trannies, way back when. It was truly eye-opening and replaced Round he Horne for me as my favourite radio programme.

How do you decide what to read next?


I've been reading

Post 14

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

Chance, fancy and intent.

I've begun making lists. This year I'm reading Robert Sapolsky and H.P Lovecraft.

Inter-leaven between that are any books I happen across and think yes. Like T.P's Nation or the one I read the other day i shan't name 'cos it's going to be a QI reference. I've recently ordered a book on the history of coloured pigments and on atmospheric phenomena

Similarly sometimes I'll set myself a challenge like reading all the Foundation novels or Harry Potter or one year I set about reading up on evolutionary biology and palaeontology.


I've been reading

Post 15

toybox

That's a moment I like very much, the moment when you have finished a book but not yet decided which one to start next (although sometimes I know in advance).


I've been reading

Post 16

Sho - with added slapping hand

Interesting, TRiG, sometimes I'll do that sort of thing (although this year it appears to be "I'm NOT picking up LOTR again") I'm currently reading Swallows and Amazons, something I haven't read since I was about 11 and it's so fab, that not only do I want to go camping I want to read all the others too.

Recently I went through the Sharpe novels, I'm now "doing" Hornblower (in my dreams!) and am wondering what to pick up after that.

Toybox*, I love that moment. Although at the moment my "to be read" shelf is groaning under the weight of loads of books I got on my last charity book trawl and some sneaky Amazon visits, I keep thinking of other things I want to read...

*I typed Toyboy first. Hmmmmm


I've been reading

Post 17

Sho - with added slapping hand

smiley - doh sorry, Clive and TRiG.

That last comment was to Clive. I was going to say something completely different, addressed to TRiG then forgot what it was and just carried on typing.

My brian hurts.


I've been reading

Post 18

toybox

Toyboy? smiley - bigeyes

I just gave up on a 'to read' shelf, and have enjoyed the inbetween moment even more ever since. The 'to read' list just grew faster than I could cope with, not to mention that I would pick books from other shelves anyway smiley - biggrin

Plus, not having such a list feels like the whole world is your 'to read' shelf smiley - earth


I've been reading

Post 19

Sho - with added slapping hand

Yes, toyboy smiley - laugh

I only have a "to-read" shelf because that's where I put all the new books and all of smiley - chef's books that I will read after him, probably. Because I'm the only one allowed to put the books back on the bookshelf because, apparently, I'm the only one who can tell the difference between fiction and non-fiction, knows the alphabet and can subdivide the auto-biographies and biographies correctly.

It's better for everyone to just Step away from the bookshelf.


I've been reading

Post 20

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

I'm meant to be reading Discworld in order. And, while I'm waiting for number five, Sorcery, to arrive, I'm meant to be reading something other than Discworld. But I read The Wee Free Men today, in an illustrated edition. It's stunning.

TRiG.smiley - booksmiley - witchsmiley - fairysmiley - elf


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